Photographer. Archivist. Writer.

Services

Zane Andres Archivist offers scanning, digitizing of your memories for sharing amongst family, reliving the past, and archiving for posterity.

We can generally scan almost everything, but these are the most common formats:

  • 35mm Negatives and Slides

  • 120 Negatives

  • 110, 126, 127 Negatives and Slides

  • Prints up to 8x12

Unsure of what you have? Check out our Film Guide below.

*Unfortunately at this time we cannot scan 4x5 negatives, disk film, nor do we deal in 8mm or 16mm film.

Film Guide

This is a small list of the types of film negatives you may come across. There are many more that exist that I might be able to archive for you.

35mm

The most common type of film, used by amateurs and professionals alike. Developed in the 1930s the negatives measure 24mm x 36mm and come in strips of four or six after being developed. The rolls of film are available in 12, 24, 27 and 36 exposures. Most SLRs will use this type of film. This film can also be “halved” to double the number of exposures. This is still widely used and produced today.

35mm film.png

110

Developed in 1972 this film came in cartridges of 24, this was a reduced version of the 126 film format with frames measuring 13mm x 17mm. It is also popularly known as “Instamatic” film due to being designed for the Kodak Instamatic line of cameras. Because of the small frame size, it is harder to take high quality images from these negatives and there is more film grain present than on other film types. This film is no longer in production.

110 Film Cartridge

110 Film Cartridge

110 Film Negatives

110 Film Negatives


120

 

Known to most modern photographers as Medium Format, this film format was developed in 1901 as one of the first commercial available films for amateurs and it is still available to this day. The negatives are always 56mm wide but can be anywhere from 41.5 mm to 224 mm long, though the most common measurements are 56 x 41.5, 56 x 56 and 56 x 84. These are also know as 6 x 4.5, 6 x 6, and 6 x 9 respectively. Later a 220 film was developed, though this film is exactly the same but with double the amount of available exposures. 

The spool the film is housed on is 6cm wide and many other 6cm film types exist, such as 620 film. These are functionally identical to 120 negatives; the difference lies in the spool used to hold the film. Also, while known as medium format, medium format technically refers to any film size bigger than 35mm film but smaller than 4x5 Inch large format.

120 Film is always 6cm wide but can vary in length from 45cm to 90cm

120 Film is always 6cm wide but can vary in length from 45cm to 90cm


126

Developed in 1962, this format was designed to be a cheaper alternative for photographers using point-and-shoot cameras. It is also popularly known as “Instamatic” film due to being designed for the Kodak Instamatic line of cameras. The negatives themselves measure 28mm x 28mm, and are usually proceeded on strips of four in rolls of 12, 20, and 24. The 110 film format is derived from this. This format is no longer in production

Each frame measures 28mm x 28mm.

Each frame measures 28mm x 28mm.


127

Developed in 1912, this was an extremely popular film format until cartridge based films became more widespread. Also known as Autographic and Vest Pocket Film. These negatives are all 40mm wide, though the length can vary from 30mm, 40mm, and 60mm. This film is still available to this day, albeit as a niche.


127 measures 40mm x 40mm.

127 measures 40mm x 40mm.

Slides

Instead of developing a negative, slides contained a positive which could be projected towards a screen meant for viewing. Like negatives, the most common size is 35mm positives places between 2x2 squares of cardboard. Other sizes also exist ranging from 110 all the way up to 127 “Superslides”.

35mm Slide

35mm Slide

Halved 35mm Slide

Halved 35mm Slide

110 Slide

110 Slide

126 Slide

126 Slide

127 Slide

127 Slide

127 "Superslide"

127 "Superslide"


APS

Developed in 1996 this format struggled to find a place in the market with the advent of digital cameras. Most regulated to amateur and point and shoot level cameras, this film came in a cartridge which also housed the negatives after processing ( a novel idea but one predicated on the condition that film developers would remain widespread...). It never really caught on and was discontinued less than a decade after it was introduced.

Despite it’s failure to find an audience, the frame size of the negative (25.1mm x 16.7mm) later became the basis of modern crop sensor Digital SLRs.

aps film.png

Disk

Developed in 1982, this film format was marketed as an easy alternative for consumers. The negatives themselves are only 8mm x 10mm, meaning their quality is extremely low with a high amount of film grain. This format was a flop and barely lasted a decade before being retired and becoming the bane of archivists everywhere.

Seriously these things blow.

Seriously these things blow.


Large

The most common size of large format negatives is 4x5 negatives that are used in press cameras, but the term large format refers to any type of large format film bigger than 4x5 inches. Bigger the film, higher the image quality, higher the development costs. Still in production to this day, though uncommon.